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Meal Prices
Breakfast:
Paid Students
$1.75
Reduced Price Students
$0.30
Adults
$2.00

Lunch:
Paid Students
$2.75
Reduced Price Students
$0.40
Adults
$3.25
Charge Policy
1. Charges over $40 will not be allowed. Students will not be able to receive a lunch paid out of their cafeteria balance when it is over a negative $40 balance.

2. An automated message will be sent each week for students with negative balances.

3. When charges reach negative $20.00, a letter or call will be made from the Principal's office.

4. All debts must be paid by the end of the year.

Non-Discrimination Policy

about 1 year ago

Non-Discrimination Statement

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. 

 

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits.  Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

 

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

 

(1)     Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

         Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

         1400 Independence Avenue, SW

         Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

 

(2)     Fax: (202) 690-7442; or

 

(3)     Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 
 


By Ross Randall

Free and Reduced Meals

about 1 year ago

Students from households who receive food stamps and/or Temporary Aid to 

Needy Families (TANF) and who have a social security number on file at the 
school may be eligible for direct certification. Students approved by direct 
certification are not required to have an application on file.
Application forms are sent home the first week of school with a letter to 
parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced price meals, parents of students not approved by direct certification must fill out the application and return it to the school as soon as possible. Additional copies are available in the principal’s office.

Children from households with incomes of less than or equal to the income criteria may be eligible for either free or reduced priced meals.

Important: A new application must be filled out at the beginning of each school year in order for meal benefits to continue. Meal benefits begin on the day the application is approved at the Child Nutrition Office and continue throughout the school year in which the application is approved, the summer, and approximately the first thirty days of next school year. Any student that does not have a current application on file with our school district will be unable to receive meal benefits after the first of September of each academic year

 

ONLINE LUNCH APPLICATION

Our Goals and Objectives

about 1 year ago

Objective

Our program’s objective is to improve the health of our students by providing palatable and nutritious foods while enhancing their nutrition education

Goals

  • To offer each child an opportunity to purchase foods that will add to his/her physical well being.
  • To provide each child the opportunity to participate in a school breakfast and lunch program coordinated with the general curriculum.
  • To provide each child the opportunity to purchase a meal that meets at least one-third of his daily nutritional requirements, at a price the child can afford to pay.
  • To provide attractive, well-prepared foods of high nutritional value.
  • To provide each child the opportunity to take part in leadership training, through participation in the school breakfast and lunch program.
  • To offer important learning skills in health, citizenship, and social knowledge which compliment other educational subjects.
  • To provide a setting and assist in teaching Nutrition Education as it relates to various subject areas and all grade levels.
  • To provide each child the opportunity to participate in a program in which the administrators, faculty, and the Board of Education are fully aware of the nutritional and educational potentials of the School Food Services Program.
  • To provide special activities and resources to assist in teaching students better nutritional behaviors.
  • To function as an integral part of the educational system of the Lamar County School District.

USDA Guidelines

about 1 year ago

ADEQUATE NUTRIENTS WITHIN CALORIE NEEDS
Consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages within and among the basic food groups while choosing foods that limit the intake of saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, salt and alcohol.

Meet recommended intakes within energy needs by adopting a balanced eating pattern, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide or the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Eating Plan.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT
To maintain body weight in a healthy range, balance calories from foods and beverages with calories expended.

To prevent gradual weight gain over time, make small decreases in food and beverage calories and increase physical activity.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Engage in regular physical activity and reduce sedentary activities to promote health, psychological well being, and a healthy body weight.

Achieve physical fitness by including cardiovascular conditioning, stretching exercises for flexibility, and resistance exercises or calisthenics for muscle strength and endurance. 

FOOD GROUPS TO ENCOURAGE
Consume sufficient amounts of fruits and vegetables while staying within energy needs. Two cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables per day are recommended for a reference 2,000-calorie intake, with higher or lower amounts depending on the calorie level.

Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables each day. In particular, select from all five vegetable subgroups (dark green, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables, and other vegetables) several times a week.

Consume 3 or more ounce-equivalents of whole-grain products per day, with the rest of the recommended grains coming from enriched or whole-grain products. In general, at least half the grains should come from whole grains.

Consume 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk or equivalent milk products. 
     

FATS
Consume less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fatty acids and less than 300 mg/day of cholesterol, and keep trans fatty acid consumption as low as possible.

Keep total fat intake between 20 to 35 percent of calories, with most fats coming from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as fish, nuts, and vegetable oils.

When selecting and preparing meat, poultry, dry beans, and milk or milk products, make choices that are lean, low fat, or fat-free. 

Limit intake of fats and oils high in saturated and/or trans fatty acids, and choose products low in such fats and oils.

CARBOHYDRATES
Choose fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole grains often.

Choose and prepare foods and beverages with little added sugars or caloric sweeteners, such as amounts suggested by the USDA Food Guide and the DASH Eating Plan.

Reduce the incidence of dental caries by practicing good oral hygiene and consuming sugar-and starch- containing foods and beverages less frequently. 
     

SODIUM AND POTASSIUM 
Consume less than 2,300 mg (approximately 1 teaspoon of salt) of sodium per day. 

Choose and prepare foods with little salt. At the same time, consume potassium-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Those who choose to drink alcoholic beverages should do so sensibly and in moderation-defined as the consumption of up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.

Alcoholic beverages should not be consumed by some individuals, including those who cannot restrict their alcohol intake, women of childbearing age who may become pregnant, pregnant and lactating women, children and adolescents, individuals taking medications that can interact with alcohol, and those with specific medical conditions.

Alcoholic beverages should be avoided by individuals engaging in activities that require attention, skill, or coordination, such as driving or operating machinery. 
   

FOOD SAFETY
To avoid microbial food borne illness: Clean hands, food contact surfaces, and fruits and vegetables. Meat and poultry should be washed or rinsed.

Separate raw, cooked, and ready-to-eat foods while shopping, preparing, or storing foods.

Cook foods to a safe temperature to kill microorganisms. 

Chill (refrigerate) perishable food promptly and defrost foods properly. 

Avoid raw (unpasteurized) milk or any products made from unpasteurized milk, raw or partially cooked eggs or foods containing raw eggs, raw or undercooked meat and poultry, unpasteurized juices, and raw sprouts.


Pay-On-Line

about 1 year ago

ForThe Cafe

Fresh roasted coffee, exclusive teas & light meals

Dear Parents:
 
With current national attention being focused on children’s health and wellness issues, Lamar County School District’s Child Nutrition Department is excited to continue to be among one of the first school districts in the State to provide parents a convenient, easy and secure online prepayment services to deposit money into your child’s school meal account at any time. This service also provides parents the ability to view your child’s account balance through a web site called MySchoolBucks. By having money in each child’s account prior to entering the cafeteria, we find the lunch lines move along much faster so your child has more time to eat and be with friends.
  
Also, parents will have the ability to print out a copy of their child’s eating history report. This history report will show you all dates and times that your child has purchased a breakfast and or lunch within the past 90 days.
 
To access these services
  • Go to www.MySchoolBucks.com
  • From this site you will create your account and add money to your child’s school meal account. All you need is your child’s name, student ID number and school ZIP code. The instructions listed here will guide you through the easy online account set up process.
 
In the near future, we will also have the ability to offer an interactive menu planning that allows parents and child to view upcoming school meal menu choices, make menu selections and view nutritional facts about their choices. Parents and children will also have the opportunity to access a number of nutrition education sites so that you can learn together about smart meal selections and choices, exercise and overall health and wellness
We are very excited to offer these new services, in direct alignment with the Districts’ Strategic Wellness Plan, and are confident this new system will benefit you, your child and our District. However, if you choose not to take advantage of the online prepayment service you may continue to make advance payments via check, which should be payable to your child’s school Cafeteria (ie Purvis Cafeteria, Sumrall Cafeteria, etc) Please write your child’s full name on the check.
If you have any questions about these new services, please feel free to contact my office at (601) 794-8994.
 
Best Regards,
 
Julie Hamilton/Julianne King
Child Nutrition Director


For more information please see the Parent Guide

Special Diets and Allergies

about 1 year ago

Special Diet Requirements

Regulations permit substitutions for children with special needs

A statement from a physician supporting a student’s condition and prescribed substitution must be submitted to the Child Nutrition Department as soon as diagnosed.

A medical statement for milk allergies is required for each school year.

For non-disabled individuals, the supporting statement shall include:

  1. An indication that the medical or other special dietary needs restrict the child’s
    diet.
  2. The food or foods to be omitted from the child’s diet and the food or choice of
    foods that may be substituted

The medical statement must include

  1. Identification of the medical or other dietary need
    which restricts the child’s diet
  2. The food or foods to be omitted from the child’s diet,
    and the food or choice of foods to be substituted
  3. Signature of a licensed medical
    authority.

NOTE
A medical statement from your child’s physician must be on file annually in order for us to meet
their special dietary requirements.

Food Allergy

Generally students with food allergies or intolerances do not have a disability as defined
under 7 CFR 15b.3 of USDA’s nondiscrimination regulations, and school food authorities
may, but are not required to, make substitutions for them. However, when in the
licensed physician’s assessment, food allergies may result in severe, life-threatening
(anaphylactic) reactions, the child’s condition would meet the definition of “disability,”
and the substitutions prescribed by the licensed physician must be made. See above for
what the physician’s statement should include and use Exhibit 6.3 when requesting this
statement.

To assist with the guidelines, some situations with responses follow:

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Situation 4A child has a life-threatening allergy that causes an anaphylactic (allergic) reaction to peanuts. The slightest contact with peanuts or peanut derivatives, such as peanut oil, could be fatal.
QuestionTo what lengths must the food service go to accommodate the child? Is it sufficient for the school food service to merely avoid obvious foods, such as peanut butter, or must school food service staff research every ingredient and additive in processed foods or regularly post all the ingredients used in recipes?
ResponseThe school has the responsibility to provide a “safe,” non-allergic meal to the child if it is determined that the condition is disabling. To do so, school food service staff must make sure that all food items offered to the allergic child meet prescribed guidelines and are free of foods which are suspected of causing the allergic reaction. The general rule is to exercise caution at all times. Do not serve foods to students at risk for anaphylactic reactions, if you do not know what is in them. It is important to recognize that a child may be provided a meal that is equivalent to the meal served to other students, but not necessarily the same meal.

School Meal Requirements

about 1 year ago

The Lamar County School District Child Nutrition Program operates under the guidance of the National School Lunch Act. In adherence to this act, all school menus have been carefully selected to insure that all nutritional requirements have been met and are based on student acceptance. A variety of menu items are offered for middle school and high school students, while a limited choice is offered to elementary students.

  • The LCSD is a member of the State Department Cooperative that assures the highest quality food products are purchased for students, each having been student-tested before being placed on bid. All processed foods are required to have a label attached before they can be purchased. (See item A.) All breads/grains must be enriched.

Beginning the school year 2006, the Child Nutrition Department will serve whole grain bread products, without frostings, for breakfast. All extra food sales will remain the same. A student must purchase a school lunch to obtain any extra sales items: Bottled water, juice, baked chips, or whole grain cookies.

The Goal

The nutritional goal for school lunches is to furnish at least 1/3 of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of the National Research Council for children of various age groups. The School Lunch Pattern requirements provide the framework for nutritionally adequate school lunches.

Add Other Foods, not part of the lunch requirements, as needed to complete lunches, to help Improve acceptability, and to provide additional food energy and other nutrients. To help assure that all School Lunches meet the nutritional goal, it is required that lunches include:

  • A Vitamin A vegetable or fruit at least twice a week
  • A Vitamin C vegetable or fruit several times a week
  • Several foods for IRON each day
  • Keeping fat, sugar, and salt at moderate levels
  • Offering a choice of foods
  • Serving no one form of meat or meat alternate more than three times a week, if no choice of foods is offered

The Lamar County School District takes great pride in meeting these requirements daily.

Additional Goals include:

  • Meeting 1/3 of the Recommended Dietary allowances (RDA)
  • Meeting Calorie Goals (age appropriate)
  • Meeting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The Lamar County School District exceeds these requirements. (See school menu nutrient analysis.)

FAQs

about 1 year ago

Why should my child buy lunch at school rather than bring it from home?

The school breakfast and lunch assures that your child is receiving nutritionally-balanced meals. More variety, an established dietary guideline, is easier to achieve through school menus. Also, the subsidized school lunch is less expensive than a lunch of equal nutritional value that is prepared and packed at home.

 

How can lunch be sold to students for a price much lower than the cost?

Lamar County Schools receives federal and state funds for every student meal they serve. This reimbursement makes up the difference between what the lunch costs to produce and what the students pay. The amount of federal reimbursement paid per lunch depends on the economic needs of the student.

 

Why is the meal priced as a unit rather than pricing food items separately? 

A balanced meal provides essential nutrients. Omitting foods, such as vegetables and fruits, may lead to undernourishment and poor scholastic performance. Buying the meal as a unit encourages students to accept and eat the complete meal. Meals not priced as a unit would cost the student considerably more money. Research shows the higher the meal price, the lower the number of students participating in the meal program.

National School Lunch Policy

about 1 year ago

1. What is the National School Lunch Program?  

The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 100,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential childcare institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 29 million children each school day. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch Program to include reimbursement for snacks served to children in after school educational and enrichment programs to include children through 18 years of age.

The Food and Nutrition Service administers the program at the Federal level. At the State level, the National School Lunch Program is usually administered by State education agencies, which operate the program through agreements with school food authorities.

2. How does the National School Lunch Program work? 
Generally, public or nonprofit private schools of high school grade or under and public or nonprofit private residential child care institutions may participate in the school lunch program. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the lunch program get cash subsidies and donated commodities from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price lunches to eligible children. School food authorities can also be reimbursed for snacks served to children through age 18 in after school educational or enrichment programs.

3. What are the nutritional requirements for school lunches? 
 School lunches must meet the applicable recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which recommend that no more than 30 percent of an individual’s calories come from fat, and less than 10 percent from saturated fat. Regulations also establish a standard for school lunches to provide one-third of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, iron, calcium, and calories. 
School lunches must meet Federal nutrition requirements, but decisions about what specific foods to serve and how they are prepared are made by local school food authorities.

4. How do children qualify for free and reduced-price meals? 
Any child at a participating school may purchase a meal through the National School Lunch Program. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals, for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents. For the period July 1 through June 30, 130 percent of the poverty level is $29,000 for a family of four: 185 percent is $39,000).
Children from families with incomes over 185 percent of poverty pay a full price, though their meals are still subsidized to some extent. Local school food authorities set their own prices for full-price (paid) meals, but must operate their meal services as non-profit programs.

Afterschool snacks are provided to children on the same income eligibility basis as school meals. However, programs that operate in areas where at least 50 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals may serve all their snacks for free.

5. How much reimbursement do schools get? 
Most of the support USDA provides to schools in the National School Lunch Program comes in the form of a cash reimbursement for each meal served. The current (July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010) basic cash reimbursement rates are:

Free lunches:$2.68Free breakfast:$1.46
Reduced-price lunches:$2.28Reduced-price breakfast:$1.16
Paid lunches:$0.25Paid breakfast:$0.26

Higher reimbursement rates are in effect for Alaska and Hawaii, and for some schools with high percentages of low-income children.

6. What other support do schools get from USDA? 
In addition to cash reimbursements, schools are entitled by law to receive commodity foods, called "entitlement" foods, at a value of .17 cents for each meal served in a Fiscal Year. Schools can also get "bonus" commodities as they are available from surplus agricultural stocks. 
Through Team Nutrition USDA provides schools with technical training and assistance to help school food service staffs prepare healthful meals, and with nutrition education to help children understand the link between diet and health.

7. What types of foods do schools get from USDA? 
States select entitlement foods for their schools from a list of various foods purchased by USDA and offered through the school lunch program. Bonus foods are offered only as they become available through agricultural surplus. The variety of both entitlement and bonus commodities schools can get from USDA depends on quantities available and market prices. 
A very successful project between USDA and the Department of Defense (DoD) has helped provide schools with fresh produce purchased through DoD. USDA has also worked with schools to help promote connections with local small farmers who may be able to provide fresh produce.

8. How many children have been served over the years? 
The National School Lunch Act in 1946 created the modern school lunch program, though USDA had provided funds and food to schools for many years prior to that. About 7.1 million children were participating in the National School Lunch Program by the end of its first year, 1946-47. By 1970, 22 million children were participating, and by 1980 the figure was nearly 27 million. In 1990, over 24 million children ate school lunch every day. In Fiscal Year 2005, more than 29.6 million children each day got their lunch through the National School Lunch Program. Since the modern program began, more than 187 billion lunches have been served.

9. How much does the program cost? 
The National School Lunch Program cost $7.9 billion in FY 2005. By comparison, the lunch program’s total cost in 1947 was $70 million; in 1950, $119.7 million; 1960, $225.8 million; 1970, $565.5 million; 1975, $1.7 billion; 1980, $3.2 billion; 1985, $3.4 billion; and 1990, $3.7 billion.

For more information: 
For information on the operation of the National School Lunch Program and all the Child Nutrition Programs, contact the State agency in your state that is responsible for the administration of the programs. A listing of all our State agencies may be found on our web site at www.fns.usda.gov/cnd, select “Contact Us”, then select “Child Nutrition – School Meal Programs”

You may also contact us through the office of USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, Public Information Staff at 703-305-2286, or by mail at 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 914, Alexandria, Virginia 22302.

School Breakfast Program


1. What is the School Breakfast Program?
The School Breakfast Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. It began as a pilot project in 1966, and was made permanent in 1975.

The School Breakfast Program is administered at the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service. At the State level, the program is usually administered by State education agencies, which operate the program through agreements with local school food authorities in more than 78,000 schools and institutions.

2. How does the School Breakfast Program work?
The School Breakfast Program operates in the same manner as the National School Lunch Program. Generally, public or nonprofit private schools of high school grade or under and public or nonprofit private residential child care institutions may participate in the School Breakfast Program. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the breakfast program receive cash subsidies from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve breakfasts that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children.

3. What are the nutritional requirements for school breakfasts?
School breakfasts must meet the applicable recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans which recommend that no more than 30 percent of an individual’s calories come from fat, and less than 10 percent from saturated fat. In addition, breakfasts must provide one-fourth of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and calories. The decisions about what specific food to serve and how they are prepared are made by local school food authorities.

4. How do children qualify for free and reduced price breakfasts?
Any child at a participating school may purchase a meal through the School Breakfast Program. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the Federal poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals. (For the period July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2004, 130 percent of the poverty level is $23,920 for a family of four; 185 percent is $34,040.) Children from families over 185 percent of poverty pay full price, though their meals are still subsidized to some extent.

5. How much reimbursement do schools get?
Most of the support USDA provides to schools in the School Breakfast Program comes in the form of a cash reimbursement for each breakfast served. The current (July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010) basic cash reimbursement rates are:

Free breakfasts$1.46
Reduced-price breakfasts$1.16
Paid breakfasts$0.26

 

Schools may qualify for higher "severe need" reimbursements if a specified percentage of their lunches are served free or at a reduced price. Severe need payments are up to 23 cents higher than the normal reimbursements for free and reduced-price breakfasts. About 65 percent of the breakfasts served in the School Breakfast Program receive severe need payments.

Higher reimbursement rates are in effect for Alaska and Hawaii. Schools may charge no more than 30 cents for a reduced-price breakfast. Schools set their own prices for breakfasts served to students who pay the ull meal price (paid), though they must operate their meal services as non-profit programs.

6. What other support do schools get from USDA?
Through Team Nutrition, USDA provides schools with technical training and assistance to help school food service staffs prepare healthy meals, and with nutrition education to help children understand the link between diet and health.

7. How many children have been served over the years?
In Fiscal Year 2001, an average of 7.8 million children participated every day. That number grew to 8.2 million in Fiscal Year 2002. Of those, 6.7 million received their meals free or at a reduced-price.

Participation has slowly but steadily grown over the years: 1970: 0.5 million children; 1975: 1.8 million children; 1980: 3.6 million children; 1985: 3.4 million children; 1990: 4.1 million children; 1995: 6.3 million children.

8. How much does the program cost?
For Fiscal Year 2003, Congress appropriated $1.68 billion for the School Breakfast Program, up from $1.54 billion in Fiscal Year 2002.

The cost in previous years: 1970: cost of $ 10.8 million: 1975: cost of $ 86.1 million; 1980: cost of $287.8 million; 1985: cost of $379.3 million; 1990: cost of $ 596.2 million; 1995: cost of $1.05 billion.

For more information:
For information on the operation of the School Breakfast Program and all the Child Nutrition Programs, contact the State agency in your state that is responsible for the administration of the programs. A listing of all our State agencies may be found on our web site at www.fns.usda.gov/cnd , select "Contacts".

You may also contact us through the office of USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, Public Information Staff at 703-305-2286, or by mail at 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 914, Alexandria, Virginia 22302.

Special Milk Program


1. What is the Special Milk Program? 
The Special Milk Program provides milk to children in schools, childcare institutions and eligible camps that do not participate in other Federal child nutrition meal service programs. The program reimburses schools and institutions for the milk they serve. In 2005, 5,375 schools and residential childcare institutions participated, along with 1,011 summer camps and 642 non-residential childcare institutions.

Schools in the National School Lunch or School Breakfast Programs may also participate in the Special Milk Program to provide milk to children in half-day pre-kindergarten and kindergarten programs where children do not have access to the school meal programs.

The Food and Nutrition Service administers the program at the Federal level. At the State level, the Special Milk Program is usually administered by State education agencies, which operate the program through agreements with school food authorities.

2. How does the Special Milk Program work? 
Generally, public or nonprofit private schools of high school grade or under and public or nonprofit private residential child care institutions and eligible camps may participate in the Special Milk Program provided they do not participate in other Federal child nutrition meal service programs, except as noted above. Participating schools and institutions receive reimbursement from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for each half pint of milk served. They must operate their milk programs on a non-profit basis. They agree to use the Federal reimbursement to reduce the selling price of milk to all children.

Any child at a participating school or half-day pre-kindergarten program can get milk through the Special Milk Program. Children may buy milk or receive it free, depending on the school’s choice of program options.

3. What types of milk can be offered and what are the nutritional requirements for the milk program? 
Schools or institutions may choose pasteurized fluid types of unflavored or flavored whole milk, low-fat milk, skim milk, and cultured buttermilk that meet State and local standards. All milk should contain vitamins A and D at levels specified by the Food and Drug Administration.

4. How do children qualify for free milk? 
When local school officials offer free milk under the program to low-income children, any child from a family that meets income guidelines for free meals is eligible. Each child’s family must apply annually for free milk eligibility.

5. How much reimbursement do schools get? 
The Federal reimbursement for each half-pint of milk sold to children in school year 2006-2007 is 0.145 cents. For children who receive their milk free, the USDA reimburses schools the net purchase price of the milk.

6. How much milk is served annually in the Special Milk Program? 
In 2005, over 100 million half-pints of milk were served through the Special Milk Program. Expansion of the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs, which include milk, has led to a substantial reduction in the Special Milk Program since its peak in the late 1960′s. The program served nearly 3 billion half pints of milk in 1969; 1.8 billion in 1980; and 181 million in 1990.

7. How much does the program cost? 
In fiscal year 2005 the Special Milk Program cost $16.6 million. By comparison, the program cost $101.2 million in 1970; $145.2 million in 1980; and $19.1 million in 1990.

For more information: 
For information on the operation of the Special Milk Program and all the Child Nutrition Programs, contact the State agency in your state that is responsible for the administration of the programs. A listing of all our State agencies may also be found on our web site at www.fns.usda.gov/cnd, select “Contact Us”, and then select “Child Nutrition – School Meal Programs”.

You may also contact us through the office of USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, Public Information Staff at 703-305-2286, or by mail at 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 914, Alexandria, Virginia 22302.

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